Rory Story Cubes Part 2

So now that I got the basics down I decided to start figuring out what was going to happen in the story. I pulled out the set of action dice. Each set comes with nine dice so I divided them into three: beginning, middle, end. For the beginning I got this:

The beginning

The beginning

To me this is interpreted as: the humans have realized through research, or maybe by communicating with the Star Guides, that their is a race of beings out there that are able to bend reality by doing certain rituals. So they send an expedition out to the planet, lets call it Eloyet (the human’s nickname it “Brimstone”), and it is a complete disaster. The diplomats and researchers have lost contact with Earth and are presumed dead or in danger. The humans send another expedition that is more military in nature. The objective is to retrieve the first expedition as well as attempt to accomplish the mission of the first expedition. Next I rolled the middle chapter of the story:
The Middle
This screamed “MacGuffin” to me. All these stickmen are dealing with what appears to be a ball. So the middle of the story is driven by the search of this MacGuffin. What if the MacGuffin is the “heart” of one of these alien trees? The competing factions of the story all believe that this item is the key to the alien’s power over reality. But a question arises: what makes this object special? Why don’t one of the factions go and chop down one of these trees and get one for their own? So I then had to come up with the concept that the planet Brimstone is a sick planet and some catastrophe befell it in the past. These trees are almost extinct and they can only grow in small patches in a limited number of areas on the planet. All of these groves of trees are fiercely guarded by tribes of Onz-Etin, the aliens of the planet. So the MacGuffin is a rare tree that grows out in the wild outside of the protection of the natives. The images of the dice suggest the progression of events: Faction A retrieves the MacGuffin, Faction B and C fight with A over control of the MacGuffin. One of the Factions (or if I want to be really crazy Faction D) obtains the MacGuffin is gets it into an air/spacecraft presumably gets away. A missile shrieks from the planet’s surface and strikes the craft. The craft, and the MacGuffin within it, crash near the protagonist’s base and he gets himself entangled into the fight.
The last group of dice were as difficult as the first two were easy. Suffice it to say that  I was scratching my head at these:

The End?

The End?

Uh…someone knocking on a door, a butterfly and a net, and a someone lifting weights. I got nothing. I don’t really know what to do with these. It was then that I realized that the Story Cubes are probably not the best at finding the conclusion of a story. Without anything capturing my imagination I just chucked out the last three and decided to simplify the ending. So what I did was take a generic die and an action die.

This is the basic action of the Story

This is the basic action of the Story

To me this translates to that the main character is struggling to get home and back to his family. He does not want to be involved with the bullshit for this MacGuffin. But of course as the story would continue events would either keep dragging him back in or the character would have to say “now its personal.”
The final roll that I made was for another character. I decided that I should probably make some roll for a villain. A major antagonist. Here was my roll. This one was difficult but it did give me a great result. I took the die to mean that he is a character that does not believe in a morality. He believes that chance and probability really rule things. Sort of like the depiction of Two-Face from Batman fiction: he determines your life with a flip of a coin. Also with the tower I turned that into viewpoint on warfare, military conduct, and treatment of civilians that is reminiscent of the Dark Ages.The character might even say that he admires the Dark Ages because back then there were no rules (now the historian part of my brain is objecting to that but whatever). To this character there is no such thing as any rule of engagement. The only rule is to win, by any means possible. But there is another side to his character and that is the bridge. I struggled with this one but I decided that he was very persuasive with his viewpoint and actually had a infectious personality. The same way that I find the Joker in The Dark Knight hilarious as well as despicable. You might say that he is very good at building bridges and gaining allies.

The Villain Roll

The Villain Roll

If you like any of the idea presented here please feel free to take it and run with it. Consider it a writing prompt. Because there are still a lot of holes that need to be filled in. So there you have it, a story brainstormed entirely with Rory Story Cubes. I hope you enjoyed the journey with me.

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